Category: Power BI

Lately I’ve been building a report, which had not happened for a while, and I enjoyed the process. The final result too is simple yet effective, so I thought I would share the approach here because, yes, there is a calc group in place that does some of the magic.

This approach is valid when you want to follow the status of something, warehouse inventory, accounts pending to be conciliated, parking occupation. In all these situations, you are likely to be more interested in the latest snapshot than the previous ones, but at the same time you might be interested in the trends that lead to the present picture, and maybe even go back to a previous shapshot to have a look, without too many clicks. As you can see we’ll need to be smart about the date filter. For some elements we want the last snapshot only for others all of them, and yet we want we want the charts to interact.

Continue Reading..

Well, hello again. If you just got started with Tabular Editor scrips and programming in general, maybe today’s topic might be a bit too much, but if you either familiar with other programming or already know your way in c# scripts, then this will certainly become a valuable thing: in-script classes! I know it sounds scary and not something that you need, but if you want write awesome code and make your coding life better in general, they you need to pay attention: In-Script classes for Tabular Editor C# Scripts are a thing.

Continue Reading..

Well, well, this is another article about C# Scripts. A topic that deserves much more attention than it’s getting. If you haven’t read my previous post, go do it right now because otherwise writing a c# script is a very frustrating experience. Not as much as building a Data Factory pipeline as a newbie, but almost.

If you have already programmed in other languages, many of this will be obvious, but anyway, is good to see how this applies to C# scripting for Tabular Editor. In this article we’ll talk about checking what is selected, checking what is in the model, interactions with the user and avoiding some of these interactions. Let’s get started!

Continue Reading..

A few months back I wrote an article of what I thought would change the way I (and many more I thought) would write c# scripts from now on. In that article I explored the possiblity of creating a custom dll with all the classes and methods that would make my scripts shorter, more robust and more sophisticated all at once. The idea was cool but not quite convenient nor for development nor for distribution. However something good that came out of that is that my colleague showed me it was possible to have really good intellisense for Tabular Editor C# scripts inside Visual Studio! So even if you are not thinking about custom classes, you should definately be thinking on Visual Studio as your home for actual coding. Today I want to talk only on how to set it up so that it will not let you do anything that Tabular Editor 2 will not accept.

Continue Reading..

Well it’s no secret that I like calc groups. But it’s also true that calc groups have an achiles heel. Calc Item names are constant, so for charts, legends stay the same no matter what. Depending on your use case you might get away with it, but sometimes you might get an end user that will not buy it — and he or she might be an important person, so it’s always good to have a Plan B. Field Parameters have brought fresh air, and indeed are great for such use cases because it’s not like you modify the DAX of the measure in the chart, you actually change the measure, so the name shown in the legend also changes, which is great. However, what happens if you want to create a chart where the user can pick from 4 KPI’s and say 8 time intel calculations?? First you’ll have to create the measures, then the field parameter, then figure out how to model that for the user to be able to select measure and calculation intependently… I mean it’s not impossible, but looks long and boring. Let’s see what we can do about it!

Continue Reading..

Hi, today I want to talk about inactive relationships. Those relationships with the dashed line that unless you invoque them with USERELATIONSHIP they do nothing. The thing is a common pattern if you read this blog — let’s say you have a retail model, and for some charts you need to use the order date and in other charts the delivery date. Other than that measures are the same, such as Sales amount,  total cost, margin etc. Well, you could do a copy of each of the measures and wrap it in a CALCULATE( … USERELATIONSHIP(… ) ) or do a calculation group.  Today we’ll do that, with style.

Continue Reading..

So today I recevied a question on the SML group which looked like the perfect use case for a calculation group. Somebody was trying to build a matrix and wanted to have the values without decimals but the totals with decimals. In other words the goal was defining different formats for values and totals. Without calculation groups, the only way you can get close to that is by using the function FORMAT, but that’s a dirty trick that will come back and get you because now your values are text. If you later use that measure in a SUMX expression for instance, it will not recognize it’s a number anymore. Of course you could keep a measure for the value and a different measure for the formatted value, but hmmm then you would have to do that for all measures that you might want to use this way and well, you would have to manage this sprawling number of measures.  Let’s check both ways in case someone has external tools blocked or something.

Continue Reading..

As soon as I learned how to define transparency in HEX encoding for Power BI, I started thinking on how to control it with a calculation group. After all, you can only define transparency through a color measure, so it made sense. If you have seen any of my most recent presentations on Calculation Groups you might have seen a use case in which I show it’s possible to control the transparency (and light level!) of a color measure with calculation groups. However in such presentations I also say that I’m still looking for a decent use case to put them into practice. Today I’m attempting to do just that with the transparency calculation group.

Continue Reading..

I realize that I use the word «arbitrary» a lot on my blog posts, but then I think, «so what?». Anyway, this blog post is mostly a remake on another blog post, the one called «A truly dynamic tooltip«. When I wrote that blog post, I had struggled a lot to get the effect I wanted, but even though I learned a lot in the process I ended up convinced that it was better to stay out of calculation groups when building such a chart. Well, this is no more. Calculation groups, are ususal, are just fine. You just need to know how to use them.

Continue Reading..

I thought I would let the blog rest for a few days, but I figured out I would write a short one on a topic that Rick brouhgt up on LinkedIn: Controlling Calculation Items with RLS. I lived under the impression that being a table you could just apply RLS like in any other table, but he told me that Power BI throws and error when you try, and sure enough I got the same result. Tried cheating by creating a calculated column in the Calculation group, but the same result. But then I remembered the technique I used on my article on arbitrary two row header tables, and I gave it a try. It does work, so if you’re interested, keep reading. Continue Reading..


Contacto

Contacta con nosotros y descubre el poder de la información.

Nombre
Email
Consulta

Ok! Mensaje enviado.
Error! Verifica los campos.
© Copyright 2022 - Esbrina