Tag: Calculation Groups

Once again I’ll recreate here a use case I found at work because I think it’s cool and with some gotcha’s that can be fixed.

The use case itself is broad enough. We are measuring the duration of an event (working hours, machine runs, etc) and we want to visualize it. Since we want to compare things, we need to graph a number, however, as humans, we might like to see 4h 30min instead of 270 min. Searching around in google you will find several approaches for transforming a number of minutes or seconds into higher units of time. And that’s a great starting point. For example here’s a great post by Reza Rad. Here we’ll just imagine we have minutes and we want hours and minutes.

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I’ve been meaning to write this post for quite a few weeks if not months, and looks like today I may start finally to do it. The detonator has been that I had to do it at work, and Yuki asked about it on twitter. Too much of a coincidence to let it go.

Conditional formatting when calc groups are involved is a bit more challenging, but as usual with calc groups, once you grasp how they work you can do almost anything you want with it.

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After a long break due to a truckload of presentations (for my standards) here I’m back again with the blog.

I have a pile of ideas, but always the latest idea takes priority as it is hot, it’s burning in my head.

A guy from the Barcelona Power BI User Group asked me if calc groups could help him in a measure he was running. It’s like a measure of measures. There are several measures that represent different organizational KPIs, and they have a disconnected table in which there’s a target for each measure. He wants to know the percentage of targets that were met.

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It’s a loooong title (well, it was «Conditional Formatting with divergent color gradient for values and totals»), but it’s exactly what I wanted to achieve when I discovered the limitations of the conditional formatting options in the GUI of Power BI Desktop. The key words are «dynamic» in one hand and «values and totals in the other» I know, some of you may think I’ll be doing some copy-cat article of the crazy video from Bas in which he shows how to use the undocumented (that I know of) function hsla(). A function that you need to leave as text?!? Crazy, just crazy. But no, I take a complete different approach and I think it’s worth the effort! Of course you can take ideas from both me and Bas and come up with your own unique approach for dynamic conditional formatting.

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If you have worked with Matrix visual you probably have faced the problem: Your end user would like to group all the measures that are thrown in into neat little groups, putting all de Quantity- related measures in one group, all the value measures in another, for example. What I’ve seen so far is that people just struggle with the fact that this is not possible in the Matrix visual, and add text boxes on top, as if the header was indeed a two-row header. But it’s not. And if you have a large matrix that requires horizontal scroll, you’ll know what I am talking about. Can we do any better? Yes. Are calculation groups involved? You bet. Difficult DAX? Not at all!

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Ok, I have maybe gone a bit overboard with the title, but I think it has some advantages over other hacks out there to establish the column widths of matrix, so here I am to explain how I came up with it and how to use it.

The first hack I saw was from Ben Ferris (aka The Power BI Guy) which added a dummy measure with a number of 0 to make the width (having automatic width enabled) and then it would disable automatic widths and remove the measure. Nice. But of course, if new columns appear you’ll  need to set the thing again. Something similar happens with the approach of Bas, who skips the dummy measure thing and instead just plays with the format string to show the evenly wide number. His approach is cooler because you skip the measure thing, but you have the same weak points.

However, Bas’s video got me thinking on the topic and the role of format strings…

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This may seem trivial, but it did not pop up in my head at first, so might be useful to somebody else.

In sales reports, there are lots of numbers. And if it’s a large company these numbers may be very large. So depending on the visual, the full number may be a bit too much, and having just thousands or millions is more than enough.

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In this post I’ll explain how to break the tyranny of the «all filters» that are passed to the tooltip in particular the filters set by a calculation group which are even nastier to get rid of than regular filters.

It wasn’t intended this way, but this post is sort of a sequel (and not SQL) of my post on dynamic labels for time calculation series, which itself builds on the post introducing the time intelligence calculation group script. If you have not read them you can also watch the video you’ll find on the end of each post — although from the sound quality maybe it’s less painful to read the blog!

Anyway, if you are here probably you know something about calculation groups, and that’s good, because there’s plenty of them coming.

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Sometimes we face models which can’t be built because we fall into the circular relationship (which Power BI protects us against) or ambiguity (which sits there silently making all our results meaningless). I faced one of this situations the other day at work and found a workaround with –you guessed it– a calculation group.

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Ok, by now you probably know I’m a liiiiitle too much into calculation groups. Once you try calculation groups there’s no going back. Particularly if you do time intelligence analysis (that is comparing values with the previous year, but many other things as well). The reason is that normally you would create a new measure for each pair of calculation – measure, (e.g. Sales Amout PY, Sales Amount YTD,  Total Cost PY, Total Cost YTD … ). With calculation groups you just create the box that shifts a measure into producing the time calculation that you want.

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